Labeling Genetically Engineered Food: Your Right To Know

by Jennifer on July 17, 2012

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I don’t think you question my passion for real food and choosing organic food when possible. One big part of the reason I seek out organics is because of my concerns about genetically modified foods (especially corn since it is in soooo many items we consume) but wouldn’t it be nice to always know if the food you are about to purchase is Genetically Engineered/Modified?

California’s Right to Know Genetically Engineered Food Act will be on November’s ballot as Proposition 37. “The Right to Know measure calls for labeling genetically engineered foods and, if passed, would be the first law in the United States requiring labeling of a wide range of genetically engineered foods.”

“This November, consumers in California will cast a critical vote on the right to know whether the foods they enjoy are genetically modified. This is simply a matter of consumer choice,“ said Marion Nestle, professor at the Department of Nutrition, Food Studies and Public Health at New York University and author of the blog FoodPolitics.com.

“The California Right to Know initiative is a simple measure that requires labeling of genetically engineered foods, which are plants or crops that have had their DNA artificially altered by genes from other plants, animals, viruses or bacteria, in order to produce foreign compounds in that food. This type of genetic alteration occurs in a laboratory and is not found in nature. The United States is one of the only developed nations that does not provide consumers with labels stating that the food has been genetically engineered.”

Did you know that in Europe, maybe 5% of their foods contains GMO’s? Do you know that in the U.S., that number is 70%? In America, our government says “prove it’s NOT safe”…and in Europe they had a different approach. They said “you need to prove it IS safe.” Those are two very different approaches to food safety.  Today GMOs comprise about 70% of the food supply at the grocery store, compared to 5% in Europe.

Don’t you agree that we have a fundamental right to know what we are eating?

Are you thinking ‘Why do I care because I do not live in California? Because this is part of a movement that can spread across the United States and hopefully, a proposition of this sort can be on the ballot in your state.

If you are on Twitter, you can get invovled by tweeting about this issue as much as you can from now till November using both hashtags #yeson37 & #labelgmos when doing so. You can also copy and tweet this: “Passionate abt. labeling #GMOs? Join #CARighttoknow Evangelist Team to make a difference! http://bit.ly/NiCGV4 #yeson37″.

If you have a blog, you can get invovled as well by joining in the team!

Here are some additional resources for you to browse over your morning coffee:

Additional resources:

FAQs about Prop. 37

Myths and Facts

65 Health Risks of GM Foods

What Foods in US have GMOs

How Foods are Genetically Engineered

{ 4 comments… read them below or add one }

Leah Segedie July 17, 2012 at 12:17 pm

Why should you care about California? Because when California makes sweeping laws like this, it makes a big impact on business. We have a VERY large state with lots of people. If companies have to change the packaging for California, it’s very likely they will roll out that same packaging nationwide. Which means that support for California WILL affect the grocery store in your hometown. Fight for us! You will benefit as well. :)

Yum Yucky July 18, 2012 at 3:46 pm

It’s such a huge undertaking, fighting the powers that be. But it can be done. In the meantime, I may move to Europe.

Debra July 27, 2012 at 11:09 am

You Californians, get out there and vote this law in!

Aqiyl Aniys March 14, 2014 at 10:42 pm

I support the right to know. I eat a wholefood plant based diet and I don’t want any of those GMOs in my food!

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